Camp Evans device aided Allies in World War II

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A U.S. soldier on a bunker in Belgium uses a Eureka device to guide a supply drop during World War II.

WALL TOWNSHIP — A secret device, designed by scientists at Camp Evans during World War II, made a huge difference on D-Day and ensured Allied victory during the Battle of the Bulge.

Recent research into de-classified war documents at the National Archives in Maryland uncovered the connection to Camp Evans, said Camp Evans historian Fred M. Carl.

The cutting-edge device, code-named PPN-1A, was known as “Eureka.”

“It made the impossible possible,” Mr. Carl said.

Specially trained soldiers, known as the Pathfinders, used the Eureka device to send electronic homing beacons to transport planes so that troops and supplies could be dropped at the right spot during battle, Mr. Carl said. “No longer would a team of paratroopers jump at the wrong time to land in enemy territory, separated from the main force.” 

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